revell.doc - first generation                                                                                              file last edited 20 Apr 2014

REVELL

 

 (1) John REVELL b. 1800   m.c1825 d. 5 May 1882 Port Adelaide, SA (informant George Edward HADDY cabinet maker of Port Adelaide, Death cert transcript-KS)  aged 87 years of senile decay, biog: gentleman of Port Adelaide in 1882     m/to

Ann WALKLAND b. 1801

The 1848 French revolution displaced many Nottingham lacemakers living in France. They were there to build and maintain the complex machinery invented in Nottingham. They were transported to Australia in three ships - Agincourt and Fairlie to Sydney and the Harpley to Adelaide, funded through donations and the British Government.

Two different (?) ships lists

REVEL

John

48

 

Hannah

47

 

Elizabeth

37

 

Anne

18

 

Milicent

16

Passengers aboard the Harpley - Harpley Arrived Adelaide 2 September 1848

SURNAME

NAMES

OF

YEAR BORN

Revel

John

 

1800

Walkland

Anne

 

 

Revel

Elizabeth

 

1828

Revel

Anne

 

1828

Revel

Milicent

Mansfield

1831

……………

1.

Ann REVELL b. 20 Oct 1828 & bp 23 Nov 1828 Mansfield Wesleyan, Ntt, Eng. (d/o John REVELL & Ann, IGI reg) m. 16 Jul 1849 "Trinity Church", C of E, Adelaide, SA. (#3/141) d. 14 Aug 1871 at residence in St Vincents Street, Port Adelaide, SA. (wife/o Francis REYNOLDS builder of St Vincent Street, D.cert-KS #74/1871 Port Adelaide) aged 43 years of Pthisis - eleven children m/to

Francis REYNOLDS b.   see REYNOLDS family

 

2.

Millicent REVELL bp. 14 Oct 1831 Mansfield, Ntt, Eng. (d/o John REVELL & Anne, IGI reg) m. 20 Jan 1851 St Pauls, Port Adelaide, SA. (aged 19 years, LDS Family Search & #6/38 Adelaide)    m/to

John FULLARTON b. 1827 see family below

 

3.

Charlotte REVELL bp. 7 May 1834 Mansfield, Ntt, Eng. (d/o John REVELL & Anne, IGI reg)

 

4.

Joseph John REVELL bp. 24 Jan 1836 Mansfield, Ntt, Eng. (s/o John REVELL & Anne, IGI reg) possibly died 1838 (Q1 1838 #15/365 East Retford) no age given

 

 

+ + + + + + + + + + + + + +

 

            fifth child of John REVELL and Ann LOWE

(1) Millicent REVELL bp. 14 Oct 1831 Mansfield, Ntt, Eng. (d/o John REVELL & Anne, IGI reg) m. 20 Jan 1851 St Pauls, Port Adelaide, SA. (aged 19 years, LDS Family Search & #6/38 Adelaide) d. 10 Dec 1862 Queenstown, SA. (w/o John FULLARTON (DH) in #15/19 Adelaide, SA.) aged 31 years   m/to

John FULLARTON b. 1827 (likely in Scotland – two Johns born s/o Archibald & Janet (likely) or s/o Archibald & Marion (possible) – 1841 census) Scotland. (aged 24 at marriage in 1851) likely d. 10 Mar 1860 Portland Estate, Adelaide, SA. (#9/119 Adelaide, SA.) aged 33 years - four children

Since the parents both died young, the children married at various residences of friends.

…………….

1.

Janet FULLARTON b. 4 Sep 1851 Adelaide, SA. (#3/264 Adelaide) m. 4 Jul 1874 res of Mr HEARING. Port Adelaide, SA. (d/o John FULLARTON, #100/59 Port Adelaide, SA.) d. 1917 SA. (#408/159 SA) bd. Feb 1917 Cheltenham Cem (Find a Grave) aged 65 years    m/to James Augustus CROOKES b.   (s/o George Augustus CROOKS in 1874 marriage

 

 

A.

Millicent Ann CROOKS b. 3 Feb 1875 Port Adelaide, SA. (d/o James Augustus CROOKS & Janet FULLARTON, #148/454 Port Adelaide) single mother

1. Harold CROOKS b. 28 Nov 1905 Adelaide, SA. (s/o Millicent Annie CROOKS, #756/92 Adelaide)

 

Millicent Anne CROOKS later married m. 1925 Adelaide, SA. (#303/818 Adelaide)    m/to

William Ernest OLIVER b. cc1875

 

 

B.

Emily CROOKS b. 1877 Port Adelaide, SA. (d/o James Augustus CROOKS & Janet FULLARTON, #184/192 Port Adelaide) m. 1900 Port Adelaide, SA. (#204/ 1035 Port Adelaide) d. 29 Jun 1906 Exeter, Port Adelaide, SA. (w/o Walter George SCHIPPER, #318/365 Port Adelaide) bd. Cheltenham Cem, SA. aged 29 years m/to

Walter George SCHIPPER b. 9 May 1876 Glanville, Port Adelaide, SA. (s/o Barnard SCHIPPER & Fanny BAKER, #166/108 Port Adelaide) d. 26 Sep 1910 Exeter, Port Adelaide, SA. (#351/484 Port Adelaide) bd. Cheltenham Cem, SA. aged 34 years   

….. a. Gertrude Millicent SCHIPPER b. 1901 Port Adelaide, SA. (d/o Walter George SCHIPPER & Emily CROOKS, #679/8 Port Adelaide) d. 1924 Port Adelaide, SA. (#472/598 Port Adelaide)

….. b. Dorothy Emily SCHIPPER b. 1906 Port Adelaide, SA. (d/o Walter George SCHIPPER & Emily CROOKS, #768/188 Port Adelaide) m. (#315/379 SA)    m/to

spouse b. cc1906

 

 

C.

Archibald John CROOKS b. 10 Nov 1879 Port Adelaide, SA. (s/o James Augustus CROOKS & Janet FULLARTON, #231/53 Port Adelaide) m. 7 Oct 1908 Woodville, Port Adelaide, SA. (#237/178 Port Adelaide) d. 22 Jan 1951 Flinders, SA. (#764/767 Flinders) bd. Cleve Cemetery, SA. aged 71 years   m/to

Emma Edith DRURY b. 9 Aug 1879 Adelaide, SA. (d/o John Greenwood DRURY & Jane Elizabeth JOHNSON, #224/334 Adelaide) d. 20 Oct 1953 Flinders, SA. (w/o Archibald John CROOKS (dec), #804/6242 Flinders) bd. Cleve Cemetery, SA. aged 73 years

1. John Archibald David CROOKS b. 1909 Port Adelaide, SA. (s/o John Archibald CROOKS & Emma Edith DRURY, #829/216 Port Adelaide) d. 25 Dec 1970 (#112A/51 SA.) bd. 1970 Cleve Cemetery, SA. aged 61 years

 

…………….

2.

John FULLARTON  b. 13 Jun 1853 Port Adelaide, SA. (s/o John FULLARTON & Millicent REVELL, #4/168 Adelaide) m. 11 Mar 1872 res of Mr Footner LUTON, of Clare, SA. (s/o John FULLARTON, #90/659 Clare, SA.)    m/to

Susan Sophia MAYNARD b. cc1853 d. Jan 1918 SA. 

 

 

A.

Charles John FULLARTON b. Aug 1872 Clare, SA. (s/o John FULLARTON & Susan MAYNARD, # Clare) d. 23 Jun 1875 Clare, SA.

 

 

B.

Annie Millicent FULLARTON b. 9 Feb 1876 Clare, SA. (d/o John FULLARTON & Susan MAYNARD, #161/480 Clare) likely m. 1895 Daly, SA. (#185/863 Daly) d. 9 Jun 1960 West Croydon, SA.    m/to

Benjamin Richard S CRABB b. 28 Jan 1861 Angaston, SA. (s/o Benjamin Stapleton CRABB (1838-1928) & Selina Levinia RICHARDS (1842-1930), #22/52 Angaston) d. 9 Apr 1950 Hindmarsh, SA. (#751/1480 Hindmarsh)

 

….. a. John Fullerton CRABB b. 27 Sep 1896 Bendleby, SA. (s/o Benjamin Richards CRABB & Annie Millicent FULLARTON, #593/180 Frome) m. 3 Nov 1920 d. 1 Jul 1963 of Walkerville, SA. crem Centennial Park, SA. aged 66 years,  m/to Mary Ann HANTON b. 1 Nov 1898 d. 1987 – 2 sons

….. b. Howard Aubrey Fullerton CRABB b. 1 Jun 1898 Clare, SA. (s/o Benjamin Richard CRABB & Annie Millicent FULLARTON, #622/248 Clare) d. 30 Nov 1918 KIA, Sutton Veny, Bed, Eng.

….. c. Philip Stapleton Fullerton CRABB b. 22 Aug 1899 Clare, SA. (s/o Benjamin Richards CRABB & Annie Millicent FULLARTON, #646/72 Clare) d. 19 Jul 1990 Adelaide, SA. crem. Centennial Park, SA. aged 90 years,  married twice, m1. Thelma JOHNS (cc1899-1938) – 3 children, then

m2. 7 Feb 1948 m1/to Dorothea Ella WILKSCH (1911-2000)

….. d. Selina Levinia Richards CRABB b. 27 May 1901 Bendleby, SA. (s/o Benjamin Richards CRABB & Annie Millicent FULLARTON, #677/251 Frome) d. 21 Nov 1979 m/to John FORGIE – 1 son

….. e. Arthur Frederick CRABB b. 26 Feb 1903 Orroroo, SA. (s/o Benjamin Richard CRABB & Annie Millicent FULLARTON, #) d. 7 May 1982 aged 79 years

….. f. Benjamin Richard S CRABB b. 16 Aug 1905 Cleve, SA. (s/o Benjamin Richard CRABB & Annie Millicent FULLARTON, #754/308 Flinders) d. 27 Jul 1981

….. g. William Ernest CRABB b. 27 Feb 1908 Daly, SA. (s/o Benjamin Richard CRABB & Anne Millicent FULLARTON, #798/335 Daly) d. 25 Jul 1968 SA. aged 60 years

….. h. Roy Maxwell CRABB b. 23 Jan 1913 Cowell, SA. (s/o Benjamin Richard CRABB & Anne Millicent FULLARTON, #) d. 23 Jul 1941 KIA Tobruk, Libya

….. i. Lucy May CRABB b. 31 Oct 1914, SA. (s/o Benjamin Richard CRABB & Anne Millicent FULLARTON, #) m. 1937 Cleve, SA. d. 1992   m/to Reginald Alfred COLES (1907-1976) – 4 chn

….. j. Douglas Mervyn Keith CRABB b. 19 Dec 1916 Cleve, SA. (s/o Benjamin Richard CRABB & Anne Millicent FULLARTON, #) d. 20 Apr 1978 Adelaide, SA. aged 61 years, not apparently married

….. k. Rhonda Joyce CRABB b. 24 Oct 1921 Cleve, SA. (s/o Benjamin Richard CRABB & Anne Millicent FULLARTON, #) m. 20 Mar 1972 d. 26 May 2011 aged 89 years, m/to Erik GULIKSEN b. 1918 d. 2001

 

…………….

 

second marriage of Susan Sophia FULLARTON nee MAYNARD   m/to

James PURDIE b. 10 Sep 1856 Munro Para East, SA. d. 22 May 1941 Gawler, SA. 

 

…………….

3.

Annie Millicent FULLARTON b. 23 Jul 1855 Adelaide, SA. (#5/188 Adelaide) m. 30 Jan 1878 res of Mrs ARGALL of Grenfell Street, Adelaide, SA. (d/o John FULLARTON, #114/361 Adelaide, SA.) d. 1937 Adelaide, SA. (w/o John FULLARTON (dec), #593/3168 Adelaide)     m/to

Robert SIMPSON b. cc1855  

 

 

A.

Robert SIMPSON b. 1880 Port Adelaide, SA. (s/o Robert SIMPSON & Annie FRILLERTON, #236/395 Port Adelaide)

 

 

B.

Walter SIMPSON b. 1882 Port Adelaide, SA. (s/o Robert SIMPSON & Annie FULLARTON, #289/385 Port Adelaide)

 

 

C.

Grace Fullarton SIMPSON b. 1885 Port Adelaide, SA. (s/o Robert SIMPSON & Annie FULLARTON, #354/184 Port Adelaide) m. 1914 Port Adelaide, SA. (#260/396 Port Adelaide) m/to

Percival Charles PATTEMORE b. cc1885

 

 

D.

John Fullarton SIMPSON b. 9 Jan 1888 Queenstown, SA. (s/o Robert SIMPSON & Annie FULLARTON, #410/275 Port Adelaide) either this or nephew d. 39 Dec 1938 Adelaide, SA. (#609/19 Adelaide)

 

 

E.

Leslie Fullarton SIMPSON b. 13 Jun 1891 Queensland, SA. (s/o Robert SIMPSON & Annie FULLARTON, #479/448 Port Adelaide) m. 21 Feb 1914 Alberton, SA. (#258/557 Port Adelaide) d. 11 Sep 1960 Hindmarsh, SA. (#912/5563 Hindmarsh) bd. Cheltenham Cem, SA.     m/to

Eva Gwendoline Pearle STEELE b. 1893 (d/o William STEELE) d. 1979 

….. a. Joy Margaret SIMPSON b. & d. c1914

….. b. Robert Ernest SIMPSON b. 8 Jan 1915 Queenstown, SA. (s/o Leslie Fullarton SIMPSON & Eva Gwendoline Pearle STEELE, #951/575 Port Adelaide) d. 17 Feb 1916 Queenstown, SA. (s/o Leslie Fullarton SIMPSON, #399/369 Port Adelaide) aged 1 year

….. c. Leslie William SIMPSON b. 15 Jun 1916 Queenstown, SA. (s/o Leslie Fullarton SIMPSON & Eva Gwendoline Pearle STEELE, #980/476 Port Adelaide) d. 12 Dec 2005 Largs Bay, SA. aged 89 years    m/to Dulcie

….. d. John Fullarton SIMPSON b. 14 May 1918 Queenstown, SA. (s/o Leslie Fullarton SIMPSON & Eva Gwendoline Pearle STEELE, #18A/315 Port Adelaide) d. 15 Feb 2003 Pennington, SA. aged 84 years, apparently married – one child

….. e. Raymond Steele SIMPSON b. 29 Jul 1919 Queenstown, SA. (s/o Leslie Fullarton SIMPSON & Eva Gwendoline Pearle STEELE, #) d. 18 May 2010 Wynn Vale SA. aged 90 years   

m/to Glenda Lillian b. 18 Oct 1920 d. 24 Apr 2001 aged 80 years – 3 sons

….. f. Leslie Fullarton SIMPSON b. 1923 Port Adelaide, SA. (s/o Leslie Fullarton SIMPSON & Eva Gwendoline Pearle STEELE, #116A/38 Port Adelaide)

….. g. Doreen Grace SIMPSON b. 1925 Port Adelaide, SA.

….. h. Roma Pearl SIMPSON b. 11 Jun 1927 Portland, SA. (s/o Leslie Fullarton SIMPSON & Eva Gwendoline Pearle STEELE, #) d. 14 Oct 2005 Craigmore, Adelaide, SA. aged 78 years

….. i. Dorothy Eva SIMPSON b. 8 Aug 1928 Portland, SA. (s/o Leslie Fullarton SIMPSON & Eva Gwendoline Pearle STEELE, #) d. 2 Feb 2003 Adelaide, SA. aged 74 years

 

…………….

4.

Archibald William FULLARTON, b. 1 Sep 1857 Port Adelaide, SA. (#11/157 Port Adelaide) d. 1861 SA. (s/o John FULLARTON (F) in #9/212 Adelaide, SA.)

 

 

STRAY

….. a. Robert Ernest SIMPSON b. 1915 Adelaide, SA. (s/o Ruth SIMPSON, #953/239 Port Adelaide) perhaps d. 1986 SA. (Adelaide Advertiser)

 

 

+ + + + + + + + + + + + + +

 

 


Further SOUTH AUSTRALIAN familes                   from DOVER / KENT

 

William REVELL b. c1823s m. 1845 Dover, Kent, Eng. (Q2 1845 #5/179 Dover, Ken)    m/to

Sarah Anne SIMMS b. c1823s

biog: arrived Adelaide on “Indian” from London, arr: on 8 Jul 1849 with wife Sarah A & 2 daughters Emily M and Sarah E.

 

1.

Emily Maria REVELL b. 1846 Dover, Ken, Eng. (Q2 1846 #5/107 Dover) biog: arrived Adelaide with parents on “Indian” 8 Jul 1849

 

2.

Sarah Elizabeth REVELL b. 1847 Dover, Ken, Eng. (Q3 1847 #5/99 Dover) biog: arrived Adelaide with parents on “Indian” 8 Jul 1849

 

3.

Frances Ann REVELL b. 23 Nov 1849 Adelaide, SA. (d/o William REVELL & Sarah Ann SIMS, #40971/1849 Adelaide, SA.) m. 1874 (#99/357 Adelaide, SA.)  m/to George MACHIN b.

 

4.

Emma REVELL b. 26 Sep 1851 Adelaide, SA. (d/o William REVELL & Sarah Ann SIMS, #3/275/1851 Adelaide, SA.) d. 1851

 

5.

William Edward REVELL b. 22 Nov 1853 Adelaide, SA. (s/o William REVELL & Sarah Ann SIMS, #4/255/1853 Adelaide, SA.) m. 1875 (#102/1 Adelaide, SA.) d. 1924

m/to Alice Maria LEAVER b. d. 1930 (w/o William Edward, #523/22 Norwood, SA)

 

6.

Alfred James REVELL b. 7 Jan 1857 Adelaide, SA. (d/o William REVELL & Sarah Ann SIMMS, #7/344/1857 Adelaide, SA.) m. 1879 (#119/1110 Adelaide, SA.) d. 1934    m/to Mary Grace STORER b. d. 1934 (w/o Alfred James, #556/3669 Adelaide,6/3669 Adelaiderd, A. SA)

 

 

+ + + + + + + + + + + + + +

 

Further SOUTH AUSTRALIAN familes                            from HAMPSHIRE

 

James REVELL b. c1825s Ham, Eng. d. 1888 SA. (#174/254 Adelaide, SA)     m/to

Martha b. c1829s d. 1872 Adelaide, SA. (w/o James, #49/114 Adelaide, SA)

biog: arrived Adelaide on “Duke of Wellington” from London via Plymouth, arr: on 11 Jul 1849 with wife Martha.

no visible children

likely second marriage of James m. 1874 Adelaide, SA. (#98/144 Adelaide, SA)

James REVELL b. c1825s Ham, Eng. d. 1888 Adelaide SA. (#174/254 Adelaide, SA)     m/to

Sarah Ann STARR b. cc1825s d. 1880 Adelaide SA. (with James HOCKLEY =BL, #102/94 Adelaide, SA)

 

likely third marriage of James m. 1882 Adelaide, SA. (#133/462 Adelaide, SA)

James REVELL b. c1825s Ham, Eng. d. 1888 Adelaide SA. (#174/254 Adelaide, SA)     m/to

Mary Jane JURY b. cc1825s

 

likely second marriage of Mary Jane m. 1894 Adelaide, SA. (#181/437 Adelaide, SA)

Mary Jane REVELL b. cc1825s

Charles GRIMWOOD b. cc1825s

 

+ + + + + + + + + + + + + +

 

A second family                                                                      CUCKNEY / LANGWITH

(1) John REVELL b. c1790s m. 14 Aug 1815 Cuckney, Ntt, Eng.    m/to

Ann LOWE b. c1790s

 

1841 census - #RG 849, Fo 13, Pg 4, Sh 3, Norton Cuckney, Nether Langwith, Ntt, Eng.

REVILL

John

1796

hd

 

m

45

ag lab

Ntt

REVILL

Ann

1796

 -

 

f

45

 ---

Ntt

REVILL

Elizabeth

1822

 -

 

f

19

 ---

Ntt

REVILL

Mary

1841

 -

 

f

m7

 ---

Ntt

1851 census - #RG 8/2122. Fo 641, Pg 13, Sh 50, Langwith Mill, Langwith, Ntt, Eng.

REAVEL

John

1790

hd

wid

m

61

Ntt

Langwith

Farm Labourer

REAVEL

Elizabeth

1823

d

u

f

28

Ntt

Langwith

Charwoman

REAVEL

Mary

1841

g/d

u

f

10

Ntt

Langwith

Scholar

REAVEL

William

1845

g/s

u

m

6

Ntt

Langwith

Scholar

……………

1.

Elizabeth REVELL  bp. 2 Jun 1822 Cuckney, Ntt, Eng. (d/o John REVELL & Ann, IGI reg)

 

2.

John REVELL  bp. 2 Jun 1822 Cuckney, Ntt, Eng. (s/o John REVELL & Ann, IGI reg)

 

3.

William REVELL  bp. 15 Jan 1826 Cuckney, Ntt, Eng. (s/o John REVELL & Ann, IGI reg)

 

4.

Mary REVELL  b. 1841 Ntt, Eng. (s/o John REVELL & Ann, census)

 

 

+ + + + + + + + + + + + + +

 

A third family                                                                                     MANSFIELD

(2) John REVELL b. c1790s m. 12 May 1821 Mansfield, Ntt, Eng.    m/to

Hannah WALL b. c1790s

 

1841 census - #RG 659, Fo 6, Pg 12, Sh 17, Rookery, Mansfield, Ntt, Eng.

REVILL

John

1791

hd

 

m

50

stockinger

Ntt

REVILL

James

1822

 -

 

m

19

stockinger

Ntt

REVILL

William

1829

 -

 

m

12

stockinger

Ntt

REVILL

Hannah

1798

 -

 

f

43

 ---

Ntt

REVILL

Sarah

1825

 -

 

f

16

twist factory hand

Ntt

REVILL

Thomas

1831

 -

 

m

10

 ---

Ntt

REVILL

Robert

1833

 -

 

m

8

 ---

Ntt

REVILL

Hannah

1836

 -

 

f

5

 ---

Ntt

REVILL

Emily

1841

 -

 

f

m7

 ---

Ntt

……………

1.

James REVELL  bp. 11 Nov 1821 Mansfield, Ntt, Eng. (s/o John REVELL & Hannah, IGI reg)

 

2.

Sarah REVELL  bp. 19 Sep 1824 Mansfield, Ntt, Eng. (d/o John REVELL & Hannah, IGI reg)

 

3.

Esther REVELL  bp. 1 Apr 1827 Mansfield, Ntt, Eng. (d/o John REVELL & Hannah, IGI reg) d. 8 Apr 1827 Mansfield, Ntt, Eng. (IGI reg)

 

4.

William REVELL  bp. 18 May 1828 Mansfield, Ntt, Eng. (s/o John REVELL & Hannah, IGI reg)

 

5.

Thomas REVELL  bp. 2 Jan 1831 Mansfield, Ntt, Eng. (s/o John REVELL & Hannah, IGI reg)

 

6.

Robert REVELL  bp. 19 May 1833 Mansfield, Ntt, Eng. (s/o John REVELL & Hannah, IGI reg)

 

7.

Hannah REVELL  bp. 30 Aug 1835 Mansfield, Ntt, Eng. (d/o John REVELL & Hannah, IGI reg)

 

 

+ + + + + + + + + + + + + +

 

A fourth family                                                                                               TUXFORD

(3) John REVELL b. c1790s m. 23 Apr 1833 Tuxford, Ntt, Eng.    m/to

Hannah SMITH b. c1790s

 

1841 census - #RG 852, Fo 15, Pg 26, Sh 6, Johnsons Yard, Tuxford, Ntt, Eng.

REVELL

John

1813

hd

 

m

28

cordwainer

Ntt

REVELL

Hannah

1805

 -

 

f

36

 ---

Ntt

REVELL

Mary

1832

 -

 

f

9

 ---

Ntt

REVELL

William

1834

 -

 

m

7

 ---

Ntt

REVELL

Robert

1836

 -

 

m

5

 ---

Ntt

REVELL

Ann

1838

 -

 

f

3

 ---

Ntt

1861 census - #RG 9/2417, Fo 11, Pg 16, Sh 85, Church Lane, Tuxford, Ntt, Eng.

REVELL

Robert

1836

hd

m

m

25

Ntt

Tuxford

shoemaker

REVELL

Jane

1841

w

m

f

20

Ntt

East Markham

 ---

REVELL

Mary

1860

d

u

f

1

Ntt

Tuxford

 ---

……………

1.

Mary REVELL  bp. 23 Jun 1833 Tuxford, Ntt, Eng. (d/o John REVELL & Hannah, IGI reg) biog: dau (9) in 1841

 

2.

William REVELL  bp. 19 Oct 1834 Tuxford, Ntt, Eng. (s/o John REVELL & Hannah, IGI reg) biog: son (7) in 1841

 

3.

Robert REVELL  bp. 10 Apr 1836 Tuxford, Ntt, Eng. (s/o John REVELL & Hannah, IGI reg) biog: son (5) in 1841

 

4.

Ann REVELL  b. 1838 Ntt, Eng. (d/o John REVELL & Hannah, census) biog: dau (3) in 1841

 

5.

Hannah REVELL  bp. 17 Apr 1841 Tuxford, Ntt, Eng. (d/o John REVELL & Hannah, IGI reg) d. 20 Apr 1841 Tuxford, Ntt, Eng. (IGI reg)

 

 

+ + + + + + + + + + + + + +

 

 


Research results (total of 1)

REVEL John, Anne WALKLAND, Anne, Eliz, Millicent arrived in SA 1848-09-02 aboard Harpley from London 05-12 [Source:4,6,20]

Look in LISWA microfiche     - 929.39
Official passenger lists, mainly of immigrants arriving in South Australia under United Kingdom assisted passage schemes, 1847-1886.
Adelaide, S.A. : State Library of South Australia, the Mortlock Library of South Australiana, 1987
11 microfiche.
MICROFORM

=============================================================

Passengers to Australia on the Harpley

Transcription kindly provided by Rosemary Oram.

List of Emigrants from Calais who have been accepted for the Harpley to sail on 1st May 1848 for South Australia.

----------------------------------------

REVEL

John

48

 

Hannah

47

 

Elizabeth

37

 

Anne

18

 

Milicent

16

----------------------------------------

 

=============================================================

another listing – this list gave the maiden names of all the wives. From book "Lacemakers of Calais"     < http://www.angelfire.com/al/aslc/harpley.html >

 

Passengers aboard the Harpley

Harpley Arrived Adelaide 2 September 1848

SURNAME

NAMES

OF

YEAR BORN

PARENTS

Revel

John

 

1800

 

Walkland

Anne

 

 

 

Revel

Elizabeth

 

1828

 

Revel

Anne

 

1828

 

Revel

Milicent

Mansfield

1831

 

 

 

DEATHS in S.A.

REVELL

John

1875-06-12

M

42y

N

(not recorded)

Lefevre Pensinsula

Lefevre Pensinsula

PtA

67

96

REVELL

John

5 May 1882

M

87y

N

n/r

Port Adelaide

Port Adelaide

PtA

119

438

 

 

 


 

The Harpley

THE EMIGRANT SHIP “HARPLEY”
This fine colonial-built ship took her departure from Deptford on the 12th May, and sighted Kangaroo Island on Tuesday the 20th August, at four in the morning. Remarkably inauspicious weather retarded the arrival within our harbour precincts, and eventually obliged Captain Buckland to trust to his cables and anchors in Holdfast Bay. During the terrific gale on Friday night, the twice parting of the small bower cable obliged the captain to have recourse to a chain cable on board, on freight, which by the help of the emigrants was got up and happily rendered conducive to the safety of the ship, the best bower holding on in the meantime, and confirming the good repute of the “holding ground” at the anchorage.

The circumstantial history of the bulk of the migrants per “Harpley” is worthy of a particular notice. With the exception of six. families, those on board the “Harpley” had been employed in French lace manufactories in or near Calais, some of them having been there eight years since they left their native place, Nottingham. At the outbreak of the French revolution the popular fury soon extended to the hitherto peaceful abodes of the refugees, and the cry of “a has les Anglais”(down with the English) would possibly have been followed by actual and violent expulsion but for the timely interference of the Consul, who besought the insurgents at least to respect the persons of the English workmen. At that time, the number of English working for, or dependent upon, manufacturing employers in Calais and its environs was nothing short of a thousand souls; of whom some have gone to Sydney, a few more are coming hither, and a ship-load were to embark at Calais for Port Philip, a fortnight after the “Harpley” left.

In their extremity the English work people in Calais not willing to return to their native town of Nottingham, or any other part of the over-stocked English labour-market, sent a memorial to Lord
Palmerston, dated April 12, desiring to obtain passages to one of the English colonies, and a large number wishing to make choice of South Australia, of which they professed to have heard through our “Voice”. In three days, an answer was returned by his Lordship, and a government Commissioner arrived to make the requisite enquiries. He was immediately succeeded by Mr. Cooper, a gentleman from the Office of Her Majesty’s Land and Emigration Commissioners, who instituted diligent scrutiny into the characters and circumstances of the memorialists, and then arranged for their passage to England, preparatory to emigration for these colonies. On their arrival in London they learned that a benevolent committee was sitting daily at the Mansion House, under the auspices of that genuine specimen of nobility the distinguished Lord Ashley, and eagerly engaged in getting up a generous subscription to which the town of Nottingham contributed 300 to 400 pounds for the relief of those who were hourly compelled to return to England from the French territory. The objections of the Commissioners to send lace makers and their families to a young colony like South Australia were compromised by an allowance of 5 pounds per head from the subscription fund, and an engagement to provide a good outfit.

The details were then arranged, and the “Harpleyappointed , the emigrants embarked, and soon the poop of the ship, to use our informant’s words, was “transformed into a haberdasher’s shop”, from which every thing necessary was gratuitously and unsparingly supplied to those who were in need, Mr. Cooper being charged with Lord Ashley’s princely commands to let the unfortunates want for nothing. Mr Commissioner Wood visited them at Gravesend previous to their departure, addressed to them an admirable speech full of kindness and encouragement, assuring them they were proceeding to a land where honesty and industry seldom failed to have their proper reward.

The only instance of death among the adults was an aged and ailing man (in his 67th year) who was unwilling to be separated from his family, and to whom the Commissioner humanely granted a free passage. He died in traversing the Bay of Biscay, the only instance of mortality besides, being a delicate infant of three months old. A sea apprentice and a young sailor named Bateman fell overboard during the passage, but both were saved by a well-directed life-buoy until they could be picked up. During the passage the ship only sighted the Cape Verd Islands and St. Pauls. The passengers, who were scarcely becalmed on the line, suffered little from heat in the Tropics, and as little from cold in the southern hemisphere, 39.5 S being the most southerly latitude attained. There was no case of serious illness during the greater part of the passage, and 236 souls have arrived in excellent health, in a remarkably clean and well-commanded ship, manned by a fine crew. During the passage Mr. Spencer the Surgeon-Superintendent read prayers every Sabbath when the weather permitted.

We have seen in the hands of the refugee Emigrants, some of the certificates granted by employers and municipal officers in France, and they speak well for the character of the people, who we hope will find they have exchanged the inhospitable treatment of the French for a hearty welcome in a British colony. Their’s is an instance calling for especial sympathy and spirited exertion on behalf of the colonists, and we shall much mistake if the newly-arrived do not in their case confirm the assurance, that any honest men and women who venture to South Australia with their off-spring will be likely to find the right hand of fellowship extended towards them in a land of peace and plenty.

We have elsewhere published the names and shall be exceedingly glad to assist, through our office, in facilitating engagements between employers and those who assure us they are anxious to make themselves useful in any capacity.

SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE - ARRIVED…. Saturday, September 2nd – The ship “Harpley” 547 tons,
Buckland, master, from London.
Passengers:
Dr John Spencer, surgeon superintendent, and John Spencer , in the cabin; and the following refugee emigrants from France – John Barnet, wife and six children, John Brown, wife and four children, Wm Burgess, wife and four children, Joseph Clarke, wife and child, John Clarke, wife and three children, Wm Cobb, wife and two children, Henry Cope, wife and seven children, Joseph Cope, Ann Cope, Henry Cope jnr, ?Fanny Cope, Wm Cope, Cornelius Crowder and wife, Hannah Crowder, Emma Crowder, Mary Crowder, George Dennisthorpe, John Davis, wife and four children (one born on the passage), Mary Ann Dennisthorpe, Richard Dixon, wife and two children, Sarah Dixon, Richard Dixon jun, David Dixon, Joseph Dixon, George Dormer, wife and six children, Thomas Dormer, Ellen Dormer, Thomas Dunk, wife and five children, John Freestone, wife and five children, Richard Goldmark, wife and four children, Jas. Hall, wife and child, John Hemmingway, wife and two children, Wm Hirold and wife, John Hibbert and wife, Humphrey Hopkins, wife and adult daughter Mary, Philip Hickey, wife and two children, James Henslie, Caroline Henslie, John Henslie, Benjamin Holmes, wife and three children, Hariet Holmes, John Irons, wife and child, Joseph James, wife and two children, Edward Lander, wife and six children
(one born at sea) and Mary Ann (adult), Henry Lee, wife and child, Hiram Langmore, wife and five children, Matthew Matthew, wife and three children, John Mountaney, wife and three children, Thomas and George (adults), Emma Needham, Wm Paul and wife, Wm Parsons, wife and seven children, Sarah, John and Ellen, adults (the youngest, three months old died at sea), Louisa Peat, Emily Peat, George Pike, wife and child, John Revel, wife and three adult daughters (Elizabeth, Anne and Millicent), Wm Henry Sanson and wife, John Sanson, wife and four children, William Sanson, Jane Sanson, Thomas Sibley and wife, John Shaw, John Smith, wife and four children (one Mary Ann, adult), Thomas Street, wife and four children, Wm Stubbs, wife and three adult children (Francis, Robert, Henry and Edward), George Saunders, wife and three children, Elizabeth (adult), John Sweeney, Theresa Sweeney, Mary Ann Sweeney, Robert Taylor, Walter Wells wife and seven children, Henry and John (adults), Thomas Wells, wife and ten children, Sarah, Richard, Thomas and Rebecca (adults), Thomas Widderson, wife and six children, Henry Watts, Charles Richmond, wife and eight children, Henry and Eliza (adults), Esther Samuels

The Lacemakers of Calais in South Australia

Graham JAUNAY  © Copyright Adelaide Proformat Tel: +618 8371 4465. Email: proformat@jaunay.com

5 Windana Mews, Glandore, SA. 5037

 

The 1848 Revolution in France had an impact on far away South Australia with the arrival of a group of economic refugees collectively known as the Lacemakers of Calais. In all over 700 lacemakers reached Australia in 1848 in three main ships, the Agincourt and Fairlie to Sydney and the Harpley to Adelaide. Strangely they were neither French nor lacemakers!


The Calais Lacemakers were English men who designed, built and maintained the extremely complex lace-making machines that had been originally developed in Nottingham. Despite the best efforts by the British to keep the manufacturing process a secret, the techniques were leaked to France and the industry developed in the Calais region using British experience and skills. After the British got over the loss of their monopoly everything was fine until the 1848 Revolution that proved to be an economic disaster for the workers as their factories were closed and English owners returned to England. The workers were faced with destitution if they remained in France or returned to England.


One group of Calais Lacemakers saw life in an English Workhouse as untenable and in March 1848 they met in a church in Saint-Pierre to sign a memorial requesting the English Government to assist them to emigrate to the Australian colonies, especially South Australia. One George Louis Liptrott, who previously arrived in South Australia on the Anna Robertson in 1839, was probably the instigator in Australia being the destination and Adelaide as the first choice. At first the request was ignored because the men were too old and had a trade not wanted in Australia and many of them had large families with numerous children under the age of ten.

The British Government was swayed by support for the idea from the English Consul in Calais, and the realisation that if these people returned to England they would put a considerable strain on the Workhouses. Appeals to raise half the assistance money were launched in London and in Nottingham, and kits were found to outfit the emigrants. The Queen and Prince Albert gave £200.

The Harpley departed 12 May 1848 for Adelaide but on arrival the lacemakers discovered prospects were little better and with little chance of work they were, with few exceptions, destined to be destitute. However, with the same determination previously exhibited, many were settled into work within the first few months. Many of the single females quickly married to save themselves a placement in the Destitute Asylum in Adelaide.

The following vessels had lacemakers in their complement too: Andromache, Baboo*, Emperor, General Hewett, Harbinger, Navarino*, Nelson and Walmer Castle with those marked * coming to Adelaide.


lace machine

 

Many modern South Australians are blissfully unaware that they may owe their origins to this determined troop of people. Check the following list of surnames and if you find one of interest type it into the search field to find out more about that particular emigrant family.

BARNETT | BOWN | BURGESS | CLARKE | COPE | CROWDER | DAVIS | DIXON |DONISTHORPE | DORMER | DUNK | FREESTONE | GOLDFINCH | HALL | HEMINGWAY | HEMSLEY | HIBBERT |HISKEY | HOLMES | HOPKINS | IRONS | JAMES | LANDER | LEE | LONGMIRE | MATHER MATTHEWS | MOUNTENAY | MOUNTNEY | NEEDHAM | ORIEL | PARSONS | PAUL | PEAT | PEPPER | PIKE | REVEL | RICHMOND | RUSHTON | SAMUELS | SANSOM | SELBY | SHAW | SMITH | STREET | STUBBS | SUMNER | SWEENEY | TAYLOR | WATTS | WELLS | WIDDISON

The Harpley

The Harpley was built near Exeter on the River Tamar in Tasmania, in the yards of the Patterson Brothers, and launched in 1847. She was measured as being of 547 tons and had two decks, a square stern and was ship-rigged on three masts. She was 122.4 feet long and 26.3 feet wide at the widest part and her depth from deck to keel amidships was 18.6 feet. She was built for James Raven, a merchant of Launceston.

between two and three hundred passengers for Spring Bay, to witness the launch of Mr Raven's ship. A portion of the band of the 11th accompanied the steamer, and played several enlivening airs during the trip down. The launch was effected without delay, in a most skilful manner; but the tide having ebbed about six inches, the vessel grounded within a few yards of the shore. Mrs Raven performed the ceremony of christening the ship, to which the name Harpley was given; she is 544 tons new register. The Swan was stationed in the Bay, where the spirited owner entertained a large number of guests; in the evening she was towed up by the steamer. The Harpley is as fine a ship of her class as was ever built in the world; her model is considered excellent, whilst the work is admirable, and reflects the highest credit upon Mr Patterson the builder. Wherever she goes, the fact of such a vessel having been built on the banks of the Tamar, will excite astonishment, and must tend to raise the capabilities of our port in the estimation of all.

On 10 February she was registered at Launceston as No 1 of 1847 and made her first voyage out of Australia in March 1847. She carried a full cargo of primary produce, then called at Hobart to embark 50 soldiers, 26 women and 40 children. She left Hobart for England on 20 March, and reached England in July. The London Times reported:

"The Harpley" - Under her three topsails and jib, with a stiff breeze from the north east, and strong ebb tide, the smart ship Harpley appeared of Plymouth on Monday morning, the 17th instant, and notwithstanding the opposition of both elements, she, cutter-like, gracefully entered the sound, and with a conscious pride took up her anchorage at the appointed station. Comparatively a few years since no one would have imagined that the far distant colonists of Van Diemen's Land would have sent to the mother country a fine specimen of naval architecture, so well qualified to mingle in one of her noblest ports, with the merchant shipping of the parent state. The Harpley was launched in Launceston on the 2nd February, 1847, and with the exception of her chain cables, was there supplied with all her materials, stores, rigging, pumps, &etc.

There are stories of her being unsound, with fault being found with the Australian timbers used to build her. This was untrue and her registration was changed from Launceston in 1847 to London at the end of her first voyage there. She was commissioned to carry the Lacemakers out of England to South Australia and she departed Deptford on 12 May and reached Adelaide on 2 September. Her next voyage from England carried an interesting contingent of Baptists. John Chandler was a child at the time, but he remembered:

In the year of the Great Famine in Ireland in 1848, there was a great stir amongst the Chartists, and much excitement in Brighton. Wagner, the Vicar of Brighton, was pressing for the Church Rates, and the Nonconformists would not pay, so he stopped the clock at St Peter's Church, which many of the town people depended on for their time. All the boys took up the cry whenever they saw him, "Who stopped the clock?" We all knew him by the grey pony that he rode. When we saw him coming we would look out for some place to escape in where he could not ride, and then shout out with all our might and run, for he had a whip like the huntsmen have...

Provisions got very dear at this time, and many people were talking about emigrating. Many were leaving for America. There was gold discovered in California... This was in 1848. Some of the members of the Ebenezer church met together and after much talk and many prayers, they resolved to emigrate... The Harpley having got all her cargo aboard and most of her passengers, we started from St Katherine's Dock on 9th September, 1849 and were towed down to Gravesend... *

From information supplied by Richard Lander, John Donisthorpe, Rolicker Chandler, Ronald Parsons & A H Bradfield.

* Forty years in the Wilderness, John Chan